Tag Archives: Darwin

Content Alert: Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, Volume 37, Issue 4 (October 2012) is Available Online Now

Cover image for Vol. 37 Issue 4

Volume 37, Issue 4 Pages 477– 657, October 2012

The latest issue of Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers is available on Wiley Online Library.

Click past the break for a full list of articles in this issue.

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Content Alert: New Articles (13th January 2012)

These Early View articles are now available on Wiley Online Library.

Original Articles

Anthropogenic controls on large wood input, removal and mobility: examples from rivers in the Czech Republic
Lukáš Krejčí and Zdeněk Máčka
Article first published online: 23 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-4762.2011.01071.x

Special Section: Exploring the Great Outdoors

‘My magic cam’: a more-than-representational account of the climbing assemblage
Paul Barratt
Article first published online: 13 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-4762.2011.01069.

Special Section: Emerging Subjects, Registers and Spatialities of Migration Methodologies in Asia

Methodological dilemmas in migration research in Asia: research design, omissions and strategic erasures
Rebecca Elmhirst
Article first published online: 13 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-4762.2011.01070.x

Commentary

The aviation sagas: geographies of volcanic risk
Amy R Donovan and Clive Oppenheimer
Article first published online: 3 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-4959.2011.00458.x

Original Articles

Diverging pathways: young female employment and entrepreneurship in sub-Saharan Africa
Thilde Langevang and Katherine V Gough
Article first published online: 13 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-4959.2011.00457.x

Original Articles

Rethinking urban public space: accounts from a junction in West London
Regan Koch and Alan Latham
Article first published online: 19 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-5661.2011.00489.x

The social and economic consequences of housing in multiple occupation (HMO) in UK coastal towns: geographies of segregation
Darren P Smith
Article first published online: 23 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-5661.2011.00487.x

The reputational ghetto: territorial stigmatisation in St Paul’s, Bristol
Tom Slater and Ntsiki Anderson
Article first published online: 30 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-5661.2011.00490.x

Fear of a foreign railroad: transnationalism, trainspace, and (im)mobility in the Chicago suburbs
Julie Cidell
Article first published online: 30 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-5661.2011.00491.x

Participation in evolution and sustainability
Thomas L Clark and Eric Clark
Article first published online: 3 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-5661.2011.00492.x

Boundary Crossings

Progressive localism and the construction of political alternatives
David Featherstone, Anthony Ince, Danny Mackinnon, Kendra Strauss and Andrew Cumbers
Article first published online: 3 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-5661.2011.00493.x

The disciplining effects of impact evaluation practices: negotiating the pressures of impact within an ESRC–DFID project
Glyn Williams
Article first published online: 9 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-5661.2011.00494.x

Alfred Wallace: Not just the “forgotten man” in the discovery of evolution

Last year we celebrated the bicentenary of the birth of Charles Darwin and the 150th anniversary of the publication of the “On the Origin of Species”. In addition to celebrations of the Darwin’s work, many articles in the media explored the contribution of other scientists and naturalists to the discovery of the theory of natural selection, perhaps none more so that Alfred Wallace. In fact, a book published by Roy Davis went even further, arguing that Wallace that has a greater claim to the theory of natural selection than Darwin.

However, as geographers, the importance of Wallace goes much further than simply his contributions to the theory of natural selection (as important as they are).

In an new article published in Geography Compass, Charles Smith explores the wider contributions that Wallace made to physical geography (and possibly even human geography…), principally in the field of biogeography, but also through his work in geomorphology and glaciology.

Wallace, based on his observations and collections (one of his major expeditions to Indonesia was funded by the Royal Geographical Society) made important contributions to understanding of the distribution of species, identifying what would become known as the Wallace Line, a boundary between faunal regions Asia and Australasia. His later publications explored the distribution of animals and the possible reasons for these patterns, and also the wider issue of why there are more species in the tropical regions than the high latitudes; an issue which is still the focus of much biogeographic research.

As Smith makes clear, we should look beyond Wallace as simply the “forgotten man” in the discovery of evolution, and recognize him as one of the great founders of wider geographical research.

Read the original article by Charles Smith here

Read an article in The Times highlighting Wallace as “the forgotten man”