Tag Archives: Sri Lanka

RGS-IBG New Content Alert: Early View Articles (16th June 2012)

The following Early View articles are now available on Wiley Online Library.

Original Articles

Visualising postcode data for urban analysis and planning: the Amsterdam City Monitor
Karin Pfeffer, Marinus C Deurloo and Els M Veldhuizen
Article first published online: 28 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-4762.2012.01096.x

Changing countries, changing climates: achieving thermal comfort through adaptation in everyday activities
Sara Fuller and Harriet Bulkeley
Article first published online: 28 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-4762.2012.01105.x

Rethinking community and public space from the margins: a study of community libraries in Bangalore’s slums
Ajit K Pyati and Ahmad M Kamal
Article first published online: 25 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-4762.2012.01100.x

Practising workplace geographies: embodied labour as method in human geography
Chris McMorran
Article first published online: 25 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-4762.2012.01101.x

Original Articles

Muslim geographies, violence and the antinomies of community in eastern Sri Lanka
Shahul Hasbullah and Benedikt Korf
Article first published online: 11 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-4959.2012.00470.x

Characterising urban sprawl on a local scale with accessibility measures
Jungyul Sohn, Songhyun Choi, Rebecca Lewis and Gerrit Knaap
Article first published online: 29 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-4959.2012.00468.x

The geodemographics of access and participation in Geography
Alex D Singleton
Article first published online: 29 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-4959.2012.00467.x

Original Articles

Towards geographies of ‘alternative’ education: a case study of UK home schooling families
Peter Kraftl
Article first published online: 8 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-5661.2012.00536.x

Boundary Crossings

Geographies of environmental restoration: a human geography critique of restored nature
Laura Smith
Article first published online: 8 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-5661.2012.00537.x

A policymaker’s puzzle, or how to cross the boundary from agent-based model to land-use policymaking?
Nick Green
Article first published online: 25 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-5661.2012.00532.x

Reacting to Disaster

Indian Ocean Earthquake

By Jenny Lunn

Natural disasters are never far from the news. Over the last 24 hours, we have heard of a tsunami affecting South Pacific islands and an earthquake in Sumatra, Indonesia. We usually watch disasters unfold on our TV screens; we sometimes give some money. Mostly we feel completely helpless about a situation far away. Some people are able to respond by travelling to the disaster area to offer their professional skills as doctors, nurses, fire fighters or engineers. But what professional skills can academics bring to such situations?

Catherine Brun’s paper in the Geographical Journal looks at researchers who conducted participatory action research in Sri Lanka after the 2004 tsunami wrought devastation on the fringes of the Indian Ocean. Post-disaster research is essential for understanding how people react to disasters and cope in the aftermath. Such insights are vital for forecasting, planning and mitigating against future disasters. However, the key question is how the research can balance being practical and helpful whilst gathering useful data.

Though referring to research in the aftermath of a disaster, the issues raised by Brun are applicable to social scientists engaged in all kinds of research, as they consider the ethics and responsibility of engagement.

60% worldRead the BBC News item about the South Pacific tsunami

60% worldRead the BBC News item about the Indonesian earthquake

60% worldRead Brun (2009) A geographers’ imperative? Research and action in the aftermath of disaster in Geographical Journal